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Benefit Of Cat Clothes

There’s no doubting the utter cuteness of kittens with mittens, cats with hats, and other adorable images of our furry friends wearing little clothes that were made just for them.

But is it just the cuteness factor that makes cat clothes worth it?

We humans, smooth and hairless as we are, need to wear clothes for protection against elements. Our feline friends, on the other hand, have luxurious coats of fur that seem to invalidate the need for clothes.

It’s important to any cat owner that their pet is safe and comfortable, so read on to learn about how cat clothes affect their wellbeing, and how to choose clothes for your cat.

Cat Clothes: Does Your Cat REALLY Need Them?

Cats definitely don’t need clothes as much as we do, but they can still benefit from a warm sweater, shirt or hoodie during the colder months.

This is true even if your home has heating during these seasons, as the morning temperature drop can give your kitty the shivers. You’ll want to give your cat clothing that is thick enough to keep their body heat locked in, yet soft and light enough not to impede their movement or annoy them.

Not all cats are made equal, and the different fur profiles of each cat breed have to be taken into account when choosing cat clothes.

For example, short-haired breeds like the Abyssinian cat, the American/British Shorthair cats, and the Bengal cat, are going to lose more body heat during very cold periods. Long-haired breeds like the Persian, Siamese, and Norwegian Forest cats, on the other hand, might not need clothing unless it’s really cold!

Some cats also have skin conditions that can cause a lot of discomfort. These conditions are most often caused by overgrooming, open wounds, or maybe even allergies. If your cat has a skin condition, it’s very important to cover up their skin so they can’t scratch or groom the affected areas.

Cat clothes are extremely useful for cats with skin conditions, it helps them protect their skin while preventing further harm.

Flea infestations and other parasites can also be stopped with a wardrobe for your kitty, but of course, it shouldn’t be relied on as the solution to the problem!

Let’s look on some benefit of cat clothes

Cat Clothes Increase Warmth and Thermal Protection

You might have noticed that cats love warm spaces, whether it’s laptops, your actual lap, refrigerators, or even phone chargers. They might also like being wrapped in blankets when they lie on your bed.

In general, cats like being warm, and this is especially important when the surrounding temperature becomes uncomfortably cold for them.

If you want to gauge how cold your kitty might be feeling, use this simple trick — if you feel cold at any time, chances are your cat is feeling cold too. If you’re wrapping yourself up in clothes and turning up the space heater, make sure your cat gets in on some of that heating action.

Clothing and fur work in similar ways when it comes to keeping a living creature warm. When you wrap yourself in thick clothing, you simulate having thick cat fur, and you feel hotter under your clothes — this additional heat isn’t being generated by your clothes, it’s actually generated by your own internal body heat being trapped by your clothes.

Without the clothes, your body heat would radiate away from your body, leaving you colder.

Putting clothes on a cat enhances the heat-trapping capacity of their fur, and can keep them warm during very cold periods that their fur wouldn’t be able to handle. If you take your cat outside into a snowy winter, you should definitely consider putting clothes on them as well.

Cats Can Overheat Easily

Just remember to be careful with how your cat is feeling when they’re wearing clothes, as they might overheat without you noticing, especially if they have thick long fur.

Cat Clothes as a Fashion Statement

Most cat owners think of how adorable their cat’s gonna be when they dress them up in cute little clothes. Perhaps your cat won’t care so much about human social conventions, but there are few things more adorable than your little furry friend in a bowtie, raincoat, or even a Halloween costume.

As long as they don’t mind the fabric pressed against their body, feel free to make your cat a canvas of cuteness. Plus, cat clothes make your kitty look meow-nificent!

Cat Clothes Can Help You Bond With Your Cat

Cats can’t get into their own clothes, so dressing them up is a slow, methodical process. Each time you dress your cat provides an opportunity for bonding between owner and pet. This is especially important if you’re a busy pet owner and hardly have time to pay attention to your cat.

When you dress up your cat, they feel you stroking them, petting and touching them, and generally paying attention to them. This is an excellent bonding activity for them and will help strengthen your relationship. While popular culture seems to paint cats as independent and fussy, your cat needs your love and attention just as dogs do!

Cat Clothes Can Boost Positive Emotions

By associating your cat’s clothes with positive feelings of bonding, you can improve your cat’s mood just by dressing them up. They’ll feel calm and less stressed if they feel that familiar warmth and comfortable texture against their bodies.

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Choose The Right Cat Litter

Choosing the right litter for your cat can seem like a formidable task. With so many types of litter out there, which one is the best for you and your Kitty? Clumping or non-clumping? Scented? Silica or clay? Flushable? Wheat, walnuts, corn or maybe recycled newspaper?

The most important thing to remember when choosing cat litter is that your cat’s needs come first. You need to choose the litter that your cat prefers and in some cases, there may be some trial and error to go through.

What Kind of Litter Does Your Cat Like?

Cats have their own personal preferences when it comes to litter. These can be the result of sensitive paws, habits created during kittenhood, or simply a whim.

Why your cat prefers one kind of litter and not another may forever be a riddle shrouded in mystery.

What matters is that you provide your cat with the kind of litter he or she feels comfortable with. Otherwise, they may reject the litter box altogether. Elimination problems are easier to prevent than to fix, so make sure you read through this guide with your cat’s preference in mind.

Why even consider the type of litter?

Thinking of changing the type of litter your cat is using faithfully?

The old adage of “if it ain’t broke – don’t fix it” works well here.

If your cat is using the box regularly and seems to be ok with your current type of litter, you should probably count your blessings and let it go. You need a VERY good reason to start messing with a cat’s litter preference.

Remember – this is about what the cat prefers. For some cats, the type of litter doesn’t make much of a difference. For others, it can be crucial enough to make them avoid the litter box following a litter box.

That said, there are situations where choosing a new type of cat litter makes sense.

Adopting a new cat without knowing his or her previous litter preference.

Bringing a formerly outdoor-cat indoors.

A serious issue with the current type of litter used

Dealing with litter box avoidance which may be related to the type of litter used.

If you’re dealing with a litter box avoidance problem, then take a minute to read our guide about litter box problems. It will help you figure out what’s wrong and help Kitty get back to using the box.

So, how to find the best litter for your cat? What considerations play a part in choosing the purrfect cat litter?

After considering your cat’s needed, here is 3 steps to choose cat’s litter:

Choosing the right materials

Traditional litter: clay-based. Clay is one of the most popular kinds of litter on the market and is a simple choice that works for most cats. It absorbs water quickly, making cleaning out urine easy, and is easy to find at most grocery stores

Look into plant-based or recycled litters. If you’re environmentally conscious, or if your cat does not take to clay-based litter, look for more natural options. Many litters are made from plant-based or recycled materials. Try something like wood pellets, wheat, corn cobs, or litter made from recycled materials.

Try silica crystal litter if you live in a small space. Silica crystal litters are litters made of synthetic materials. They’re good at soaking up urine and dehydrating feces so it’s easier to clean. Silica crystal litters make most sense if you’re living in a smaller space as they absorb odor very easily.

Pay attention to how your cat responds to different materials. Trial and error may be necessary to pick a litter that works for your cat. Cats have preferences about their litter and may dislike the texture or feel of a particular brand of litter. If your cat stops using their litter box after you purchase a litter, try a different brand. With some experimentation and patience, you should be able to find a litter your cat will use.

Choose a lightweight litter. A lightweight litter may produce less dust. It can also be easier to carry back from the grocery store if you have a long walk. Some litters are specifically labeled as “lightweight”, but some materials are naturally light weight. Corn and grass-based litters tend to be naturally lighter than other varieties.

Look for multi-cat variations of common litters. Most common litters have special blends made for multi-cat households. If you have multiple cats living in the same house, opt for multi-cat litter. These often help better suppress odor. If your cats are having litter box issues due to sharing a litter box, opt for a multi-cat variety of your chosen litter.

Dealing with Odor and Cleaning

Look for an odor-absorbing litter. Whichever material you choose, look for a litter that’s odor-absorbing. This will prevent the smell of a litter box from seeping into your home. If a litter is odor-absorbing, it should say somewhere on the label.

Decide between clumping and non-clumping litters. The question of clumping and non-clumping litter depends on your personal preference and which litters your cats take to. Clumping litter can make cleanup easier, as it absorbs urine. With clumping litter, you can scoop out the litter box rather than replacing all the litter each time you clean it.

Avoid scented litters. Odor-absorbing litters are fine, as they keep odor away. However, scented litters are not recommended. They can cause irritation for cats and many cats are repelled by the smell of scented litter. A cat is more likely to eliminate outside the box if you use scented litter.

Clean the litterbox often. Even if you purchase a litter that is very good at absorbing odors, it is important to keep the litter box very clean to ensure that your cat will still use it. Some cats are pickier about cleanliness than others, so you should keep this in mind. You should scoop the litterbox every day or every couple of days in order to cut down on odors in your home and keep your cat comfortable.

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Can Cats and Dogs Eat the Same Thing?

Many people mistakenly believe that pets eat everything, and that cats and dogs can eat the same. This isn’t the case, and many human foods are considered very harmful to them.

We need to consider that food elaborated for different species contains ingredients that satisfy the nutritional and caloric requirements of each one of them.

In addition, size, age, species and characteristics of the pet determine what it should ingest, its content, frequency and quantity. This will make the difference between good nutrition and malnutrition.

Although dog and cat food or processed food are very similar, they differ considerably. This can be verified by reading the product label. In this article, we’ll see information about what cats’ and dogs’ diets need to include, and the reasons why they shouldn’t eat the same.

Cats vs. Dogs: Nutrition

Cats and dogs have different dietary requirements. Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that cats must eat meat. It’s a biological necessity. Dogs, contrary to some beliefs, are omnivores, which means they eat meat and vegetables, so they need a more varied diet than just meat alone to meet their nutritional requirements.

Cat food is much higher in meat-based protein than dog food. This might be why cat food is so appealing to dogs, since the meat smell and flavor are so strong. However, just because dogs crave it doesn’t mean they should eat it.

Unless your veterinarian recommends otherwise, the best food for your dog is dog food, not cat food.

Cats’ nutritional requirements

In their evolution throughout history, cats have been kept on a carnivorous diet. That’s why they still require a high intake of protein and fat in their diet. That amount isn’t recommended for dogs.

We must also mention taurine, an organic antioxidant acid that protects the health of the feline heart as well as its brain, muscles and membranes. This substance also works as an important neurotransmitter. Its deficiency in the medium and long term causes blindness, nervous system problems, heart disease, and finally, death.

Likewise, an essential fatty acid required by cats is called arachidonic, which maintains the good health of their fur and skin.

Vitamins B1 and B12 should also be included in a good cat diet. B1 transforms glucose into energy for muscles functioning and the nervous system. B12 maintains the amount of red blood cells and optimizes iron levels in the body.

One of the indispensable nutrients cats is vitamin A. Canine food lacks this vitamin because the dog’s body produces it. In general, cats need more vitamins in their diets than their canine companions.

Dogs’ nutritional requirements

In the early stages of their evolution, dogs became strictly carnivorous, but later on, they developed a more varied diet. This led them to become the omnivores they are today.

The commercial feeds on the market include all the necessary components to maintain their optimal nutrition and health.

One of the dietary components required by the dog’s metabolism is beta-carotene. The body processes beta-carotene into vitamin A, which is a great antioxidant. It helps maintain a healthy vision, reproductive processes, and the bone and epithelial systems.

As an illustrative example of another important vitamin, while cats require 30 units per kilogram of vitamin E, dogs need 50 units. As we can see, dogs require less fat and protein than cats.

Canine diets must include two essential fatty acids: linoleic acid and alpha-linoleic acid. These nourish the muscles and the fur, create hormones and generate necessary elements for the cells.

Complications of Feeding Cat Food to Dogs

If your dog eats a lot of cat food on a regular basis, or if you are feeding your dog a diet of cat food instead of dog food, complications may arise, as it does not have the correct balance of protein, fiber, and all of the nutrients dogs need to stay healthy.

Dogs can certainly survive on cat food in a tough spot, but the nutrient imbalance can lead to gastrointestinal upset, obesity, and pancreatitis. Pancreatitis requires immediate veterinary care. Symptoms include abdominal pain and a hunched back, lethargy and weakness, appetite loss, vomiting and diarrhea, a distended abdomen, and fever. Even if your dog eats cat food and suffers no obvious ill effects, the high protein levels can be hard on his liver and kidney.

Consequences of an inadequate diet in pets

If dogs and cats live together in the same house, it’s very likely that, from time to time, they will eat from each other’s feeders. If it’s occasional, there’s no problem, but it shouldn’t become a habit. To avoid this, there should be a separation.

In the medium and long term, an inadequate diet in pets will cause vomiting, diarrhea and other discomforts. In the long term, the impact is more serious, as kidney and liver damage may occur.

Conclusions

In conclusion, cats and dogs can’t eat the same food because they run the risk of malnutrition, with possible consequences for their health. Given everything mentioned above, it’s clear how harmful it can be to give the pet food that doesn’t correspond to its species. The consequences are even more significant in the case of felines.

The recommendation is clear: cats and dogs can’t eat the same thing. Hence, a veterinarian should indicate the best diet and provide quality products that guarantee an optimal health state.

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How to Calm an Angry Cat

An aggressive cat is never a good thing. It can be a dangerous situation for you or any member of your family, especially unaware children. Get to the bottom of why your cat may be showing signs of aggression and learn some helpful ways to calm your cat.

Most anger in cats derives from fear, and aggressive behavior stems from your cat’s perception that it needs to defend itself. Placing your cat in any situation where fearful emotions arise will often result in anger. Knowing how to minimize and remove such situations is an important part of calming your angry cat and keeping it calm.

 

Recognizing Behaviors of an Angry Cat

Consider the motivation for your cat’s anger:

  • A cat’s primary motivation for displaying angry or aggressive behavior is fear. Cats are not as domesticated as dogs and easily revert to their wild state. This means that cats are one step away from being a wild animal still and many wild animals live in a constant state of alertness for danger, including a fear of people.
  • Top of the list for inducing fear is strangers, simply because a cat doesn’t know what that person is all about until they’ve had time to observe and trust that the person is cat friendly. Keep in mind that the reason for your cat’s fear may not always be immediately apparent to you

Recognize behaviors associated with fear or anger in your cat. Reading your cat’s body language can help avoid conflict. It is useful to recognize both fear and aggression. However, there is an overlap between both sets of behavior, so don’t get too hooked up on differentiating the two. The important thing is to recognize the cat is stressed, and stressed leads to possible attack.

Be aware that a cat can turn from being calm to afraid or angry in a matter of seconds. Signs of fear or aggression include:

  • Piloerection (hairs standing up)
  • Dilated pupils
  • A direct stare at you (precedes attack)
  • Averting its gaze (fear)
  • Whiskers stiff and drawn back
  • Ears flattened against the head
  • A hunched body posture
  • Growling
  • Drawing backs the lips and hissing

Consider the purpose behind usual “angry” behavior. Though most of these behaviors are often thought of as signs that an angry cat is about to attack, the behaviors are more typical of a stressed and fearful cat that wants to escape the situation.

 

Calming an Angry or Fearful Cat

Interrupt the aggressive behaviour: Once your cat’s aggression takes off, it can be hard for them to reel it in. If you notice signs that your cat is moving toward aggression, try to interrupt the behavior with a distraction such as whistling, throwing a soft toy in their line of vision, or shaking a jar filled with pennies. However, never interrupt the aggressive behavior by attempting to touch or pick up your cat. A cat who is already showing signs of aggression could be dangerous.

Use calming diffusers and sprays: There are a number of products on the market designed specifically for the purpose of calming cats down. These diffusers and sprays naturally mimic feline pheromones that cats recognize, the reassuring familiarity of which makes them feel safe and secure. This often results in a less anxious cat, and in some cases that means a less aggressive cat too.

Provide alternative stimulation: For many cats, aggression is a way to release energy. Providing a stimulating environment can help a cat to rid themselves of some of that energy before it spirals into aggression. Scratching posts, climbing perches, and cat condos are not only activity centers, they are also spots where a cat can curl up and get some much needed privacy. You can also stimulate your cat by playing with them, but only at times when you do not see signs of aggression. Keep your hands at a distance by using toys that you can throw or dangle, and if you notice that your cat is beginning to act aggressive, end the playtime and return when your cat is calm. If your cat is playing nicely, reward the good behavior with treats or food.

Try behaviour modification: This method for calming an aggressive cat is usually carried out under the supervision of an animal behaviorist. Behavior modification is a form of conditioning that uses positive or negative reinforcement to change undesirable behaviors. For example, if you have a cat who reacts aggressively when they are touched, you may be able to modify that behavior by forming a positive association with petting by offering treats or food when you wish to pick up or touch your cat.

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Prepare for getting a cat

Having a cat can mean different things to different people. Some want a cat to cuddle and sit on their laps; others are happy to live with a very independent cat which spends most of its time outside and doesn’t want too much human interaction.

What is important is that you try to find a cat that will interact with you if you want it to. All cats are not the same and how each individual cat behaves with you can depend on its inherent personality and early experiences (or lack of experiences), which can make it fearful or confident with people and life in general.

 

The environment in which you keep a cat is also extremely significant – for example if it lives with many other cats which do not get on, then it will be stressed and will react differently than if it was on its own.

While there is no guaranteed way to choose the perfect cat for you and your lifestyle, understanding your expectations as well as what makes cats tick will help you to bring home a cat that should be able to cope with its new environment and be the pet that you want too.

The decision to adopt your first cat is a monumental one, both for you and for your new cat. Whether you are thinking about getting a cat, or have just adopted your first one, this tutorial has been designed to make your relationship with this special cat a lasting one so the cat has found its “forever home”.

 

Here is the list “Things you should do when adopting a cat”

  • Create a Shopping List for Your New Cat

Bringing home a new cat is much like adopting a human baby. However, in the case of a cat, you’ll be shopping for a litter box instead of a changing table.

Before you bring your new cat or kitten home, there are a number of things to collect or buy, so your cat will feel like a family member rather than a visitor.

  • Prepare a Safe Room for Your Cat

A “Safe Room” doesn’t need to be a separate room but could be an empty closet, a corner of your bedroom with a protective screen, or a seldom-used bathroom. The important thing is that your new cat has a place it can call “home,” where it can retreat and rest. It may voluntarily choose to socialize with you and other family members, but for now, let it decide whether to hide or mingle. It may take several days to a week or more, depending on its history, but your patience at this point will yield exponential results in a happier relationship with your cat in later days.

  • Cat – Proof Your Home

You’ve decided where you’re going to go to adopt your new kitty; possibly you’ve already narrowed your selection down to one cat you simply must bring home. You’ve stocked up on essentials from the shopping list, and you’ve prepared kitty’s “safe room.” There’s only one step left before Homecoming Day—cat-proofing your home to save wear and tear on the household as well as the new arrival.

Although it will take a bit of time, cat-proofing your home isn’t rocket science. It only requires your willingness to get down to a cat’s level to spy out hazardous temptations, along with the ability to think like a cat.

 

  • Bring Your New Cat Home

Oh, happy day! You’ve completed all your preparations and the big day has finally arrived for bringing your new kitty home. Although everyone is excited, it’s probably better not to make this a big family event. Your new baby will probably be stressed enough without a bunch of people competing for its attention, especially if you have young children in the home.

  • Take Your Cat for Its First Veterinary Visit

Your new pet’s first veterinary visit is of supreme importance. You’ll want to assure yourself of its good health

  • Know your cat diet

The diet a cat gets early in life will set the pace for its lifelong health and well-being. Your knowledge of cat food ingredients will help ensure not only longevity but the quality of life you want for your new family member.

Although cats descend from desert creatures, fresh water is also essential to them, especially if they eat a dry food diet.

Make sure you read cat food labels to know what you’re feeding your new family member. You should review for weeks and months ahead until you feel secure in your knowledge. Once you learn to read cat food labels it will become a habit for life.

A source of clean, fresh water is also vital to your cat’s well-being. Although cats have descended from desert animals, they still need to be well-hydrated.

  • Get a Litter Box and Take Care of Sleeping Arrangements

Next, to food and water, a litter box is critical for your new cat’s comfort and health. With scrupulous maintenance of your cat’s litter box, you’ll never have to worry about odor or “out-of-box accidents”.

“But the cat goes outdoors,” you say? You’ll want to rethink that decision in one of the later steps.

Another big consideration with your first cat is “where will it sleep?” Will you share your own bed with it, get it his own cozy bed, or a combination of both? Don’t forget, you are establishing habits that will most likely last a lifetime.

 

  • Take Care Of Your Cat’s Scratching Needs

Next to litter box avoidance, undesirable scratching behavior is the top reason for shelter surrenders. Actually, scratching is as necessary to cats as eating and breathing. Cats’ claws are their most essential tools for many reasons.

When you complete this lesson, you’ll have all the tools you’ll need to ensure your cat the scratching, stretching exercise it needs, without sacrificing your hard-earned carpet and furniture.

  • Playing with your cat

Playing with your cat is a wonderful bonding experience. Cats love to play and are experts in inventing their own games. Before you invest in expensive cat toys, experiment with things found around the house. Paper bags are great fun, as are cardboard boxes.

  • Make your Cat a Family Member for Life

As time passes, your bonding with your new cat will become stronger than ever, and you and your family will consider your cat a valued family member rather than a pet.

Congratulations for caring enough about your cat. Today is graduation day and you can officially call yourself an ailurophile, or even a crazy cat lover. You are joining a group of the most wonderful, caring people in the world: those who adore their cat children.

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Benefit Of Cat Clothes

Cat Clothes & How To Choose Them: Fashionable Felines

There’s no doubting the utter cuteness of kittens with mittens, cats with hats, and other adorable images of our furry friends wearing little clothes that were made just for them.

But is it just the cuteness factor that makes cat clothes worth it?

We humans, smooth and hairless as we are, need to wear clothes for protection against elements. Our feline friends, on the other hand, have luxurious coats of fur that seem to invalidate the need for clothes.

It’s important to any cat owner that their pet is safe and comfortable, so read on to learn about how cat clothes affect their wellbeing, and how to choose clothes for your cat.

 

Cat Clothes: Does Your Cat REALLY Need Them?

Cats definitely don’t need clothes as much as we do, but they can still benefit from a warm sweater, shirt or hoodie during the colder months.

This is true even if your home has heating during these seasons, as the morning temperature drop can give your kitty the shivers. You’ll want to give your cat clothing that is thick enough to keep their body heat locked in, yet soft and light enough not to impede their movement or annoy them.

Not all cats are made equal, and the different fur profiles of each cat breed have to be taken into account when choosing cat clothes.

For example, short-haired breeds like the Abyssinian cat, the American/British Shorthair cats, and the Bengal cat, are going to lose more body heat during very cold periods. Long-haired breeds like the Persian, Siamese, and Norwegian Forest cats, on the other hand, might not need clothing unless it’s really cold!

Some cats also have skin conditions that can cause a lot of discomfort. These conditions are most often caused by overgrooming, open wounds, or maybe even allergies. If your cat has a skin condition, it’s very important to cover up their skin so they can’t scratch or groom the affected areas.

Cat clothes are extremely useful for cats with skin conditions, it helps them protect their skin while preventing further harm.

Flea infestations and other parasites can also be stopped with a wardrobe for your kitty, but of course, it shouldn’t be relied on as the solution to the problem!

 

Let’s look on some benefit of cat clothes

Cat Clothes Increase Warmth and Thermal Protection

You might have noticed that cats love warm spaces, whether it’s laptops, your actual lap, refrigerators, or even phone chargers. They might also like being wrapped in blankets when they lie on your bed.

In general, cats like being warm, and this is especially important when the surrounding temperature becomes uncomfortably cold for them.

If you want to gauge how cold your kitty might be feeling, use this simple trick — if you feel cold at any time, chances are your cat is feeling cold too. If you’re wrapping yourself up in clothes and turning up the space heater, make sure your cat gets in on some of that heating action.

Clothing and fur work in similar ways when it comes to keeping a living creature warm. When you wrap yourself in thick clothing, you simulate having thick cat fur, and you feel hotter under your clothes — this additional heat isn’t being generated by your clothes, it’s actually generated by your own internal body heat being trapped by your clothes.

Without the clothes, your body heat would radiate away from your body, leaving you colder.

Putting clothes on a cat enhances the heat-trapping capacity of their fur, and can keep them warm during very cold periods that their fur wouldn’t be able to handle. If you take your cat outside into a snowy winter, you should definitely consider putting clothes on them as well.

 

Cats Can Overheat Easily

Just remember to be careful with how your cat is feeling when they’re wearing clothes, as they might overheat without you noticing, especially if they have thick long fur.

Cat Clothes as a Fashion Statement

Most cat owners think of how adorable their cat’s gonna be when they dress them up in cute little clothes. Perhaps your cat won’t care so much about human social conventions, but there are few things more adorable than your little furry friend in a bowtie, raincoat, or even a Halloween costume.

As long as they don’t mind the fabric pressed against their body, feel free to make your cat a canvas of cuteness. Plus, cat clothes make your kitty look meow-nificent!

 

Cat Clothes Can Help You Bond With Your Cat

Cats can’t get into their own clothes, so dressing them up is a slow, methodical process. Each time you dress your cat provides an opportunity for bonding between owner and pet. This is especially important if you’re a busy pet owner and hardly have time to pay attention to your cat.

When you dress up your cat, they feel you stroking them, petting and touching them, and generally paying attention to them. This is an excellent bonding activity for them and will help strengthen your relationship. While popular culture seems to paint cats as independent and fussy, your cat needs your love and attention just as dogs do!

Cat Clothes Can Boost Positive Emotions

By associating your cat’s clothes with positive feelings of bonding, you can improve your cat’s mood just by dressing them up. They’ll feel calm and less stressed if they feel that familiar warmth and comfortable texture against their bodies.

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Choosing the Suitable Peptiles

Reptiles can make excellent pets, but sometimes inexperienced owners are overwhelmed when they realize how expensive and difficult some reptiles are to care for. Unfortunately, many owners go home from pet stores with incomplete and even incorrect information on the proper care of their chosen reptiles.

This leads to a surprised and unprepared owner when they find out what it takes to care for their pets. Unmet expectations and poor advice about reptile care can result in a bad experience for the owner and can ultimately be fatal for the reptile.

Best Reptiles for Beginners

Some reptiles are poor choices for beginners due to their diet, environmental needs, or unwieldy adult size. However, some readily available reptiles are good for beginners.

These animals are relatively low maintenance, compared to other reptiles, but they still need a significant investment in the proper equipment up front.

Thorough research before deciding on one of these pets and getting your enclosure set up before bringing your new pet home is crucial.

Snakes

The biggest obstacle for many owners is the diet needs of snakes. For most commonly kept snakes, owners must be willing to feed whole prey such as mice or rats (pre-killed is preferred).

However, snakes have the advantage of often only needing to be fed once a week or less so they can easily be left on their own for a few days without a pet sitter. They also have no requirements for UVA/UVB lights.

Corn Snakes: These beautiful snakes are docile and easy to care for. They reach an adult length of only three to five feet or so and can be expected to live 10 years or more. Corn snakes are excellent escape artists and need an enclosure with a tight-fitting lid, though!

Ball Pythons: A small constricting snake, ball pythons are usually quite docile and easy to care for. They do have a reputation for refusing to eat so potential owners should be persistent in finding a healthy captive bred ball python (you may even want to ask for a feeding demonstration to ensure the snake will readily take killed mice).

Ball Pythons can be expected to live a long life (20-30 years) and are possibly the most common kind of pet snake.

Lizards

Unfortunately, one of the most common types of lizards found in pet stores, the iguana, is not a great choice for beginners.

Due to their size, tendency to become aggressive at maturity, and specific dietary and environmental needs, they are not ideal pets. Other lizards, like Chinese Water Dragons, have very specific requirements when it comes to heat, humidity, lighting (especially the special bulbs that emit UVA and UVB light), and diet.

However, a couple of lizards stand out for their suitability for beginners.

Leopard Geckos: considered by many to be the ideal lizards for beginners since they are relatively small and easy to care for. A 15-20 gallon tank is large enough for an adult leopard gecko, and since they are nocturnal, they do not need specialized (UVA/UVB) lighting.

They are insectivores and should be fed a variety of insects. They are also quite docile and easy to handle.

Bearded Dragons: These are probably the most challenging of the beginner reptiles listed here, mostly due to the equipment needed to keep them.

These Australia natives reach a size of 18-24 inches, so they need a good sized tank (about a 50 gallon for an adult). Frill-necked lizards are a similar species which also make good beginner pets.

Both are desert dwellers, so a relatively high temperature needs to be maintained as well as exposure to UVA and UVB light (the bulbs are relatively expensive but last a long time). Owners of Bearded Dragons can expect to spend a fair amount of money on the proper enclosure, but these lizards are entertaining and easily tamed.

They need a diet that is a combination of insects and a variety of fresh vegetables and fruit.

Turtles

Fortunately, the idea of marketing turtles (particularly red-eared sliders) as wonderful pets for kids seems to have fallen from favor. Aquatic turtles get to be quite large and messy and turn out to be pretty boring to children.

It can be very challenging to meet the housing and environmental needs of most turtles (aquatic turtles and tortoises). Deciding to get a turtle requires a great deal of preparation and commitment.

Eastern Box Turtles: These turtles live a long time, but they do not get large like a lot of tortoises. They do not have the aquatic requirements like red-eared sliders have therefore they have less maintenance. Eastern box turtles live in varied climates, so they are quite adaptable and are omnivores, so they eat both plants and insects.

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Snacks and Treats for Your Cat

Snacks and Treats for Your Cat

As a cat-lover, you’ll know how tempting it can be to give your furry friend treats and titbits to eat alongside their main meals.
Scraps from the table or food fed by hand are, for lots of people, a way of showing affection to your cat. As lovely as it is getting your dear feline’s attention and having them eating out of your hand, literally, cat treats are best used sporadically and within certain limits. Here is how to get treat time right, how many treats a day to feed your pet and what to avoid.

Which cat treats to choose?

When it comes to treats for cats, your intentions may be good, but the fact is that human foods can be very high in calories and salt, and often lack many of the essential nutrients your cat needs. What this means is that you run the risk of overfeeding and/or upsetting the balance of your cat’s diet.
The good news is that many manufactured cat treats are also available – these may be designed to support digestive or dental health, or as an extra special treat or reward for your feline friend.

How many cat treats a day?

Cat treats contain calories and are usually not complete and balanced. They’re meant to given just as an occasional treat. It’s therefore important that whenever you give cat snacks to your pet, you reduce their main meal by an equivalent calorific amount. You should also limit feline treats to no more than 10% of their total daily calorie intake, so that you don’t unbalance your cat’s overall diet.

Cat treat options to consider

You should limit your cat’s treat intake to no more than about 20-30 calories from treats a day; depending on the size of the treat, that usually equates to just a few pieces. So how can you incorporate treats without breaking your cat’s caloric budget? Think outside the bag. Catnip and cat grass are very low calorie and they accomplish much the same purpose as traditional treats. You could also consider making your own treats. Remember that anything new and different is going to feel like a treat for your cat! A small bite of boiled egg, a steamed green bean…just about any nutritious vet-approved food can be a “treat” for your cat if you serve it at the right time. Remember to take calories into account if you’re actually making recipe-based cat treats and to store them in the fridge or freeze since they’ll be free of preservatives. Finally, remember that treating your cat doesn’t necessarily mean feeding her. Play time or a good rub session might be all your cat needs to feel the love.

You should always, always consult your veterinarian before adding anything to your cat’s diet. Because cats are so small, just a few extra pounds can make a huge difference in their overall health, so it’s important to be aware of whether or not your cat’s weight is normal. Regular veterinarian visits are the best way to ensure your feline companion doesn’t accidentally end up overweight.

Benefit of treating your cat

Feline Oral Hygiene

Let’s face it, brushing your cat’s teeth is a whole lot tougher than brushing a dog’s teeth, and that’s no walk in the park either. Giving your cats dental treats with their firm surface can help reduce plaque and tartar.

Reducing Stress in Cats

Treats are also another good way to help reduce stress in cats. A lot of times cats can become even more finicky about eating after experiencing an injury or when they’re recovering from an illness. Offering up a soft treat during times like this can encourage them to take part in eating when they need it most.

Training Using Treats

Just like with dogs, treat training is useful with cats as well. Training through the use of treats is actually a successful positive re-enforcement technique. It can be used when you’re trying to teach your cat to do any number of things, like staying off the kitchen table or counter tops, using the litter box or in order to keep them from clawing furniture.

Mixing it Up

Treats are another way to keep things fresh and alleviate food boredom from the same old ho-hum menu they’re served. Aside from their normal healthy diet, a little variety is a pleasant change of pace for everyone. Even if you had the opportunity to eat fillet mignon or lobster every day, would you want to? No matter what you might think, it would get old quick.

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How To Make A Cat and Dog Become Friend

How to Make a Cat and Dog Become Friend?

Thinking of getting a dog but afraid your cat won’t like it? Have a cat and a dog but the two just won’t stop fighting? While many cats and dogs don’t get along right off the bat, there are ways to help them adjust to living with each other. By taking your time and understanding what both of your pets need, you can create a happy, peaceful home with both a cat and a dog.

1. Prepare for the introduction.

Whether you are bringing a new cat or dog into a home that already has a cat or dog or you are trying to make your existing pets get along better, you need to create a good foundation to build on. To begin with, make sure that your home has ample space for the two pets to have some space away from each other. You will need to keep the pets separated for several days, so multiple rooms in your home are necessary.

Also, make sure that the dog will follow your commands. You will want to refresh its obedience training if it does not heed your directions well. Don’t let the first encounter your cat has with your dog be a bad one because of an overzealous and aggressive pup.

If you are introducing a new dog to your home or you have a young puppy that doesn’t know its commands yet, then you need to be more cautious when introducing it to a cat.

2. Go slow

Do NOT just let your dog chase your cat around. Keep the pets separate at first, waiting 3 or 4 days before actually introducing the animals face to face.[2] Animals need time to get to know each other’s smells and to get to know new homes before they can deal with getting to know another animal.

– Cats and dogs are much more likely to fight or be unhappy if you try to force them together suddenly. Keep them in separate rooms and out of sight of one another until they are both calm.

– Begin mixing the animals smells by stroking the cat then stroking the dog and vice versa (with pets in separate rooms).

Alternate the rooms you keep the animals in. This is so they can sniff where each other has been without the other animal being present. Smells are a very important way that animals get to know each other. Let your animals get to know the other’s smell before they actually get to know them face to face.
– Try rubbing a towel on your dog and then putting the towel under your cat’s bowl. This will help your cat get used to the dogs smell and accept it.

3. Let the cat and dog smell each other under the door dividing them.

This will help them associate the new smells they are smelling with a specific animal, even if they can’t actually see it.

4. Wait to introduce your cat and dog until the cat seems relaxed and ready.

If the cat is frightened and runs and hides whenever the dog gets near the door to their room, you need to give the cat more time. When the cat is adjusted to the smell and sounds of the dog, it may be time to let them see each other.

5. Hold your cat in your arms until it is calm and relaxed.

Then ask a family member or friend to slowly bring your dog on a leash into the room. Gradually bring the dog closer in small steps, waiting for your cat and dog to both settle down as each step of the way before getting closer. Do not let the animals make physical contact with each other, just get them used to the presence of the other.

Be sure to hold the cat only if it is happy to be held.

Wear long sleeves to protect your arms from scratches.

Another option is to have the cat in a crate while you bring the dog in on a leash. This will guarantee that there is no physical contact between them when they first meet.

6. Show your pets equal amounts of love as you introduce them to each other.

Animals, like people, get jealous when ‘the new kid’ gets more attention than them. Show both of your pets that they are loved by you and that the other animal is not feared by you.

7. Separate your pets once again.

Don’t force them to interact for too long, this will just exhaust them, which can lead to conflict. Make sure the first meeting is a good one by keeping it brief and pleasant.

8. Continue to have your dog and cat interact until they are relaxed in each other’s presence.

Once the cat seems comfortable enough, keep the dog on a leash but let the cat go loose in the room. After several weeks of this, your dog should be trained not to go after the cat, as so you can let the dog off the leash as well.

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How To Bathe and Grooming a Dog?

How To Bathe and Grooming a Dog?

For many dog owners, bathing a dog can be a daunting task, especially if they are new pet parents. While you might love the new addition in your family, you will not always enjoy the dog scent that your fur baby will bring into your house. Hence, washing or bathing your dog is important. Bathing your dog can help improve your relationship with it and make sure that it stays healthy. However, it sure will be difficult to bathe your dog because most dogs find bathing an unpleasant experience. Follow the steps in this article to learn the best way to bathe a dog and make it a pleasant experience for both of you.

How to Bathe?

1. Wet Your Dog

Using a hand-held sprayer wet your dog. You can even use a bucket or pitcher to wet him. Although be careful while doing so. Do not wet your dog’s face and avoid his eyes and ears too.

To clean your dog’s face, you can use a wet washcloth at the end of the bathing session.

2. Apply Shampoo

For dogs with long fur, use two parts shampoo mixed with one part water in a bowl or cup. You don’t want clumps of shampoo getting stuck in one area of the fur. If your dog has short fur, you can squirt a line of shampoo down his spine.

3. Massage

Gently scrub and massage your dog. You can use your fingers to massage him, just the way shampoo your own hair. Massage in the direction of his fur growth. This will prevent any matting, and fur from tangling.

4. Look for Problem Areas

While massaging the shampoo into his fur and skin, it is best to check your dog for any rashes, bumps, scabs, or any other problems.

5. Leave in the Shampoo

Let the shampoo remain on your dog’s coat for about 10 to 15 minutes for it to show results. Follow the instructions mentioned on the shampoo bottle to find out how much shampoo to use and how to apply it.

6. Rinse

Rinse the shampoo out of your dog’s coat with clean water. It is important that you keep rinsing until the water runs clear and there are no more soap suds. Make sure to get between the paw pads and toes since these are often places missed by many people.

How to grooming?

1. Dry Your Dog

Some people choose towels and some choose hair dryers to dry their dog. But we suggest that you let your dog have a few good shakes. Air dry him if you live in a warm climate and have bathed your dog in the morning. While towel drying, do not rub. Pat down gently.

2. Brush Your Dog’s Fur

Brush your dog’s fur to prevent it from tangling. Brushing down your dog’s fur will also help get rid of excess water from his coat.

3. Clean Your Dog’s Ears

Use a cotton ball (and not earbuds) to prevent water from entering your dog’s ears. You can use a cleaning solution to remove excess earwax from your dog’s ears.

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